Annual Meeting Report and Photos   January 28th, 2006

Sacramento — Reported by Russ Jackson, Secretary — The 2006 RailPAC Annual Meeting was held in the California State Rail Museum auditorium on Saturday, January 28, 2006. Over 100 members attended, making it one of the most successful meetings in the spirited history of the organization. “KUDOS for the KIDO”, was Director Bruce Jenkins’ comment to Executive Director Richard Silver, who organized the day, “I think it was a a great meeting. It was a smashing success. There was a very obvious POSITIVE air after the meeting broke.” All 13 officers and directors of the organization were present! Many members and guests arrived at the nearby Sacramento train station, a short walk down the platform from the CSRM. Ralph James, who planned to attend by train from his home in Blue Canyon (5,000 ft elevation in the Sierra) had to cancel his trip as the snow was falling! A photo which will accompany this report on the www.railpac.org website will show a picture of the group at the head table. The crowd included several representatives from Caltrans, Amtrak, and the Union Pacific Railroad. The meeting celebrated the opening of the RailPAC legislative office in downtown Sacramento this year. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Reports

Coast Rail Coordinating Committee   January 20th, 2006

Reported by Bruce Jenkins, RailPAC Director — This writer was arm twisted, cajoled and dragged feet first by Art Lloyd to the CRCC Policy Luncheon mtg at Mission Bay Inn in Pebble Beach. The mtg room was oriented so that we were “forced” to observe the 7th green, with a backdrop of the white breakers and blue water of the Pacific Ocean (needless to say, my limited attention span was further impaired).

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Bakersfield — Reported by Russ Jackson — Some facts and figures picked up here and there on Thursday: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Reports

By RailPAC President Noel T. Braymer — The issue of profits and subsidy for rail service is confusing. Countries differ, but most rail service world wide make or lose money the same way. After World War II, most European and some Asian governments paid subsidies to maintain a high level of rail service in their counties. The United States, on the other hand, saw major reductions in the rail system in the 1950’s and 60’s in the face of shrinking profits and traffic.

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Posted in Commentary